HAC Bidding to Build U.S. Domestic Satellite System—Hughes News January 15, 1971

Primarily for Cable TV

The Federal Communications Commission is considering a Hughes Aircraft application for a nationwide domestic satellite system primarily for cable television operations.

As planned by the Space and Communications Group the system would have two 12-channel synchronous satellites above the equator, a large ground transmitting station at each end of the country, and from 100 to 500 small receiving stations. Cost would be between $50 million and $80 million.

Channels Leased

General Telephone already has leased eight channels on one satellite for seven years at $50 million. The channels would provide 10,000 telephone circuits. The firm plans a $27 million independent system, which could be operating two years after FCC approval of the Hughes proposal.

The drum-shaped satellites, 6 feet in diameter and weighing 1120 pounds, would have an estimated seven-year operational life in orbits 22,300 miles above the equator. The 5-foot diameter parabolic antennas would be trained on the 60-foot transmission antennas of the earth stations below. The earth stations would beam up television programs which the satellites would transmit to local stations, using 30 or 40-foot receiving antennas scattered over the U.S.

Third of Year

General Telephone would use its channels to relay facsimile, high speed data signals and TV signals in addition to telephone messages. Its earth stations would be at Triunfo Pass north of Los Angeles, in Florida, Indiana, and Pennsylvania.

The Hughes-General Telephone proposal is the third of its type filed this year with the FCC. Others have been filed by Western Union Corporation and the American Telephone and Telegraph acting jointly with Comsat Corporation.

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